New Insights into Nanoindentation-Based Adhesion Testing

Year: 
2017
Month: 
8
Day: 
21
Pages: 
2237-2245
DOI: 
10.1007/s11837-017-2496-2
Type: 
Journal Articles
Journal: 
JOM
Volume: 
69
Abstract: 

Nanoindentation, or instrumented indentation, is a versatile technique that is most often used to measure the elastic modulus and hardness of thin film systems. It can also be employed to measure thin film adhesion energies by producing well-defined areas of delamination. When combined with the proper mechanics-based model and characterization of the failing interfaces, nanoindentation-induced delamination is a powerful tool to quantify interfacial fracture. This article highlights new improvements to the technique that build off the work of Marshall and Evans in the 1980s. Indentation-induced delamination in systems with brittle films or substrates can be a balance between causing delamination and causing through-thickness or bulk fracture. Focused ion beam cross-sectioning and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to characterize failing interfaces, additional fracture events were observed in the load–displacement curves, and the adhesion energy was determined using not only symmetric, ideally shaped buckles, but also irregular-shaped and half-delaminated buckles.